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The New Laws Coming To Melbourne That Could Save Your Life

Victoria Police will get clearer shoot-to-kill powers during life-threatening situations and be able to hold suspected terrorists for up to four days without court permission.

The moves are a part of sweeping reforms based on 16 recommendations from a report commissioned after the deadly Brighton siege in June.

Terrorist Yacqub Khayre shot serviced apartment receptionist Nick Hao dead and wounded three police officers before being cut down in a hail of bullets.

The report says police and protective service officers' lethal force powers should be clarified to "put beyond doubt that it applies to pre-emptive action".

"The law seemed to cover the issues necessary, but there was some difficulty in actually interpreting and understanding that it covered pre-emptive force," co-author and former chief commissioner Ken Lay told journalists on Thursday.

"The recommendations... ensure Victoria Police have clarity in some of the most deadly and critical operational issues that Victoria Police will ever need to deal with."

Mr Lay and fellow author, former judge David Harper, also recommend a "presumption against bail and parole" for those convicted of terror offences, suspected of terrorist links or who pose such a threat.

The government accepted all 16 recommendations in principle and will begin making the reforms law.

This includes clarifying police shoot-to-kill powers, elongating the preventative detention time frame and amending the parole and bail laws.

Premier Daniel Andrews says the issue of what to do with offenders post-sentence will be the subject of a second report expected soon.

He says safeguards will be put in place to ensure the new powers are not abused. However, "if it comes to a question of curtailing the rights of a small number of people to protect, tens, perhaps hundreds of thousands of other Victorians, then I won't hesitate to make that call."
"That's the modern world we live in," he said.

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